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Olga • Ольга

Olga • Ольга

Olga • Ольга
I speak:
English, Russian
I learn:
English, Spanish, German
Busuu berries :
15856

You are always welcome :) 

Johnny88

Johnny88 (25)

Johnny88
I speak:
English
I learn:
German, Russian
Busuu berries :
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Hi, I have a question, why should I say Меня зовут... (not Я зовут...). Thank you

Olga • Ольга

Olga • Ольга

Olga • Ольга
I speak:
English, Russian
I learn:
English, Spanish, German
Busuu berries :
15856

 Hi, it's a good question.

English phrase "My name is Olga" is usually translated as "Меня зовут Ольга".

 But "My name is Olga"  isn't translated "Меня зовут Ольга". The literal translation is "Me they call Olga / They call me Olga". It sounds odd in English, but it works fine in Russian =)

The grammatical subject (they; people) is omitted --> it is impersonal construction with the verb зовут (third person plural) and direct object in accusative case (Я in nominative --> Меня in accusative). Nominative case (Я) can be used as a grammatical subject only, and it is impossible to use it in this construction. 

I hope this helps =)

Happy learning!

mokes

mokes (22)

mokes
I speak:
English
I learn:
Italian, Russian, Georgian, Slovenian
Busuu berries :
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 Hello, in the vocabulary for one of the units it gives the same translation for worried and excited so could you please send me the translations of these two words.

Olga • Ольга

Olga • Ольга

Olga • Ольга
I speak:
English, Russian
I learn:
English, Spanish, German
Busuu berries :
15856

Hi,

"Excited" has different meanings:

1) feeling or showing happiness and enthusiasm

восхищённый, возбуждённый, взволнованный, потрясённый (вследствие положительных эмоций) 

2) nervous or upset and unable to relax

взвинченный, напряжённый.

Sometimes it is translated using the verb волноваться, not an adjective, e.g., 

Stop getting so excited! —> Прекрати так волноваться!

Worried:

thinking about unpleasant things that have happened or that might happen and therefore feeling unhappy and afraid:

озабоченный, also it is often translated using the verb бояться:

I was worried that she might not arrive on time. —> Я боялась, что она не придёт вовремя.

 

Hello!

I have a problem with the preposition "B" which case have I to use?

markhemstead

markhemstead (26)

markhemstead
I speak:
English
I learn:
Italian, Russian
Busuu berries :
478

"в" + accusative is used with motion verbs. Example: I am walking to school - Я иду в школу.
"в" + prepositional is used to give your location. Example: I am at school - Я в школе.

It's important to note that with some nouns, "на" is used instead. For example "на Украине" (in Ukraine).

If the place you're going to is a person, it's "к" + dative - Я иду к брату (I'm walking to my brother's place), and the location equivalent is "у" + genitive - Я у брата (I'm at my brother's place).

 

many thanks. It sounds a bit complicated, but I hope I can remind it.

Where have you learned russian?

markhemstead

markhemstead (26)

markhemstead
I speak:
English
I learn:
Italian, Russian
Busuu berries :
478

I'm self-taught, but I have had a lot of help from natives, including Olga :)

Eugene

Eugene (41)

Eugene
I speak:
English, Russian
I learn:
Spanish
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Hi! Just a tiny remark

 "На Украине" - is not correct anymore, only "B Украине" since it has became an independent state.

Honestly, it always was a little bit incorrect, like if I sad to be "in home"  instead of "at home"