Easter

Do you celebrate Easter in your country and if yes, how?


@Gina

@Gina

@Gina
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Italian
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I mean to use this exercise to tell you something that connects the palms of the area of North-Western Liguria, where I live, with Palm Sunday and the Vatican. It’s a long story, concerning the birth of a tradition. However, I don’t ask you - my friends on busuu.com - to correct this post. In fact, I related this story last summer, so I have had at that time some corrections. I write again this text because I think that it might be an interesting topic in the days before Easter. For me it’s also a way for revisiting my past local history.
In Bordighera (the town close to mine) there is the most northerly palm grove in Europe. Tradition tells us that Saint Ampelio, a religious hermit who is the patron saint of the town, still very revered today, came from Egypt and settled in Bordighera (in the fourth century A.D.), to continue his life there as a hermit, in penitence and prayer. A legend tells us that this saint planted the palms by sowing the stones of the dates that he had brought from Egypt. Really, the most reasonable explanation is that the seeds of dates had fallen from the Saracens who for centuries had raided these places, provoking inexpressible terror among the inhabitants. In the coastal region of this part of the Liguria, you can still see the supports of various turrets (http://www.sullacrestadellonda.it/torri_costiere/images/arma1.jpg and http://www.sanremonews.it/typo3temp/pics/D_a4892808ff.jpg) which were built to sight the hostile ships, since people fled inland when they drew near. Bringing to the Vatican the “palmureli” (as the braided palm leaves are called) from the Riviera of Flowers (this part of Liguria) on the occasion of Palm Sunday, is an ancient privilege that has occurred since 1586, when Pope Sisto V thanked in this way Captain Bresca, a sailor who was a native of Sanremo. He had avoided a slaughter of believers on the day when the gigantic Egyptian obelisk, (transported from Egypt to Rome in 39 A.D. at the wish of the emperor Caligula), was moved and erected in Saint Peter’s Square, according to the will of the Pope. The obelisk, that you can still admire nowadays in the centre of the square, is 26 metres high and weighs 350 tons. It was very difficult and dangerous to lift it, so the architect who planned to move the obelisk employed nine hundred workers, one hundred and forty horses and forty-four capstans. On September 10th 1586, while they were raising the obelisk, to avoid distractions from the workers, the pope had ordered that whoever uttered a word during that risky job, would receive the death penalty. The difficult venture began positively, but suddenly the obelisk staggered dangerously. The ropes that were lifting the enormous monolithic sculpture were almost at breaking point. At that moment, Captain Bresca, regardless of the possible death penalty, shouted: "Aiga ae corde!" (“Water to the ropes”, in his dialect). The imperious suggestion of the Ligurian sailor was immediately and instinctively obeyed by the engineers of the Vatican and so overheating was avoided, and consequently that prevented the breaking of the cables that were supporting the obelisk. Afterwards, the enterprise was successful (Captain Bresca, being a sailor, was an expert on ropes). Not only did the pope not sentence Captain Bresca to death, he wanted to compensate him. The sailor then asked the pope to grant to his town the privilege of sending every year the “palmureli” to the Vatican on the occasion of Palm Sunday. Since then, for more than four centuries, the towns of Sanremo and Bordighera have had their names linked to the traditional ceremony of the benediction of the palms, on the Sunday (Palm Sunday) that precedes Easter Sunday.
The “palmureli” are not simple palm leaves. To braid the bigger ones is handiwork that requires both ability and patience.
Here are three videos in English (they are available also in Italian and other European languages), from the official site of Bordighera and three others about the “palmureli”:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWAXhC1sP3w&feature=BFa&list=ULPEZbc_Tllos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOkAUNwRfN8&feature=autoplay&list=ULUWAXhC1sP3w&playnext=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEZbc_Tllos&feature=BFa&list=ULUWAXhC1sP3w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=F1rW6GRI0Vshttp://www.youtube.com/watch? http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=FnlT5kQ6oIk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=-yKSsFoxq9U
I wish a very happy Easter holidays to all my friends who are studying on bussu.com!

nycitalian2012

nycitalian2012 (60)

nycitalian2012
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Italian
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Ciao Gina, Thanks so much for posting this interesting lesson.  I just printed your exercise to read on my commute home and will look at the photos and videos in the coming week.  I very much enjoy reading about the different traditions throughout Italy.  Last night, I attended a San Giuseppe dinner with 70 Sicilians and Sicilian-Americans in a restaurant in the East Village.  The foods and traditions were all new to me so I learned a lot, while enjoying delicious Sicilian food.  However, it was a late night so I am really ready to leave work now and go home!    Grazie ancora!  a presto, Cinzia

@Gina

@Gina

@Gina
I speak:
Italian
I learn:
English, Spanish, French
Busuu berries :
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Grazie Cinzia, per aver apprezzato il mio post e per la tua consueta gentilezza.

Mi fa piacere che tu abbia passato una bella serata in cui hai avuto occasione di assaggiare degli squisiti piatti regionali italiani. La cucina italiana è molto varia e diversa da una regione all'altra, ma ovunque è ottima!

Ciao!

Rudolf-37

Rudolf-37 (67)

Rudolf-37
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I mean/intend to use this exercise to tell you something that connects the palms (of the area) of North-Western Liguria, where I live, with Palm Sunday and the Vatican. It’s a long story, concerning and it's about the birth of a tradition. However, I don’t ask you - my friends on busuu.com - to correct this post. In fact, I published this story last summer, so I already got some corrections have had at that time / then. I am writing this text again / once more because I think that it might be an interesting topic in the days before Easter. For me it’s also a way of revisiting my past (?) local history.

In Bordighera, (the town next to mine / a town close to mine), there is the most northerly date palm grove in Europe. Tradition tells us that Saint Ampelio, a religious hermit who is the patron saint of Bordighera (to be sure that it is not your town), is still very revered today. He came from Egypt and settled in our neighboring town (such as not to repeat B.) in the fourth century A.D., to continue his life there as a hermit, (already mentioned) in penitence and prayer. A legend tells us that this saint planted the palms by sowing the stones of the dates that he had brought from Egypt. On the other hand, the most reasonable explanation for these trees to be here is that the date seeds of dates originated from the Saracens who had raided this area for centuries, provoking inexpressible terror among the inhabitants. In the coastal region of this part of the Liguria, you can still see the supports of various turrets (http://www.sullacrestadellonda.it/torri_costiere/images/arma1.jpg and http://www.sanremonews.it/typo3temp/pics/D_a4892808ff.jpg) which had been built to sight the hostile ships and to allow people to flee to the hinterland inland when the enemies came close.

Bringing the “palmureli” (as the braided palm leaves are called) to the Vatican, from the Riviera of Flowers (this part of Liguria), on the occasion of Palm Sunday, is an ancient privilege that has been granted since 1586. In that year, Pope Sisto V thanked in this way Captain Bresca, a sailor who was a native of Sanremo. He had avoided the slaughter of believers on the day when the gigantic Egyptian obelisk, (transported from Egypt to Rome in 39 A.D. at the wish of for the emperor Caligula), was moved and erected in Saint Peter’s Square, according to the will of for the Pope. The obelisk, that you can still admire nowadays in the centre of the square, is 26 metres high and weighs 350 tons. It was very difficult and dangerous to lift it, so the architect who had planned to move the obelisk, employed 900 (nine hundred) workers, 140 (one hundred and forty) horses and (forty-four) 44 capstans. On September 10th, 1586, while they were erecting the obelisk, the pope forbade under penalty of death had ordered that whoever uttered a word any talking during the risky job, would receive the death penalty – to avoid any distractions from the workers. The difficult venture began positively, but suddenly the obelisk staggered dangerously. The ropes that were lifting the enormous monolithic sculpture were almost at breaking point. At that moment, Captain Bresca shouted, regardless of / unperturbed by the threatening death penalty, shouted: "Aiga ae corde!" (“Water to the ropes”, in his dialect). The imperious suggestion of the Ligurian sailor was immediately and instinctively followed by the engineers of the Vatican, and thus overheating and breaking of the ropes that were supporting the obelisk, could be was avoided, and consequently that prevented the breaking of the cables. Afterwards, and the job was successfully completed (captain Bresca, being a sailor, was an expert on ropes). Not only did the pope not sentence Captain Bresca to death, he even wanted to compensate him / to do him a favour. So, the sailor then asked the pope to grant to his town the privilege of sending every year the “palmureli” to the Vatican, on the occasion of Palm Sunday. Since then, for more than four centuries, the towns of Sanremo and Bordighera have had their names linked to the traditional ceremony of the benediction of the palms, on Palm Sunday, the Sunday that precedes Easter Sunday.

The “palmureli” are not simple palm leaves. Braiding the bigger ones is handiwork that requires both ability and patience. Here are three videos in English (they are available also in Italian and other European languages), from the official site of Bordighera and three others about the “palmureli”:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWAXhC1sP3w&feature=BFa&list=ULPEZbc_Tllos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOkAUNwRfN8&feature=autoplay&list=ULUWAXhC1sP3w&playnext=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEZbc_Tllos&feature=BFa&list=ULUWAXhC1sP3w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=F1rW6GRI0Vshttp://www.youtube.com/watch?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=FnlT5kQ6oIk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=-yKSsFoxq9U

I wish to all my friends who are studying on bussu.com, a very happy Easter holidays!

How interesting, Gina. You live in a privileged area. Best wishes to you, too!

A number of my suggestions are not compulsory. I hope I have not added any mistakes, regarding the length of your text ;-).

@Gina

@Gina

@Gina
I speak:
Italian
I learn:
English, Spanish, French
Busuu berries :
94753

Thanks for your corrections, Rudolf.

I had already published this long post some months ago, but when I have studied the unit  about  Easter, proposed now by busuu, I have thought to tell this story again. In the area of Western Liguria where I live, braiding palms leaves on the occasion of Palm Sunday is a tradition, not only in Bordighera. Here the towns are all small and close to each other. They have a nice climate, so many tropical plants (as palms) can grow.

I wish you a good night  :-)

lyndastuff

lyndastuff (62)

lyndastuff
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Very interesting, Gina.  Thanks for sending.  When I was  a little girl we always got the palms on Palm Sunday and braided them into a cross.  We hung the cross on the wall until the next year when we would replace it with another cross.

@Gina

@Gina

@Gina
I speak:
Italian
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English, Spanish, French
Busuu berries :
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Thanks for your interesting information, Lynda. 

In addition to the palms, on Palm Sunday, also small olive branches are blessed during Mass.

In the traditions of the Catholic Church, on Palm Sunday,  olive branches and palm leaves are both brought to the ceremonies in the churches.

I wish you happy Easter holidays!

 

I think that some websites helpful for you might be:

http://grammatica-italiana.dossier.net/grammatica-italiana-17.htm

http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperfetto_indicativo

http://www.oneworlditaliano.com/grammatica-italiana/imperfetto-italiano.htm

Later, I'm going to write you an email. See you soon!  :-)

Ciao!

lyndastuff

lyndastuff (62)

lyndastuff
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Grazie mille, Gina, per i links!

bponz

bponz (58)

bponz
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A very interesting article, Gina. I was not familiar with this story and tradition.

Thank you for posting it.

And your English writing is excellent.

Ciao!

@Gina

@Gina

@Gina
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Thank you, Bryan.

I wish you very happy Easter holidays.

Ciao!

StevieSteve

StevieSteve (50)

StevieSteve
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Very interesting, Gina, thank you.

Happy Easter to you and yours