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Saudi women can't do anything without a male guardian's permission – including see the advert
Here is a laudable campaign against domestic violence in Saudi Arabia – the first ever in that conservative and repressive country. Powerful and affecting – a woman in a niqab with a badly bruised eye stares into the camera above the message "some things can't be covered" – it has been written about by western media outlets from the Daily Mail to the New Zealand Herald. However, the women most likely to be affected by the violence it depicts are unlikely to be able to see it without permission from the men who rules their lives.
For the kingdom still forbids women from travelling without their male guardians' permission or from driving a car. The internet, where these women could see the image, is heavily censored and any attempt to leave the country would lead to an automatic text message being sent to her male guardian.
In 2009, the World Economic Forum's Global Gender Gap report ranked Saudi Arabia 130th out of 134 countries for gender parity. In 2011 King Abdullah promised to give women the right to vote and run for office in municipal elections, but soon afterwards a female subject was sentenced to 10 lashes for driving a car. Women, restricted by law from social mixing, can't even work in underwear shops.
The ad is part of the "No More Abuse" campaign by the King Khalid Foundation, an official charity set up in memory of an earlier 1970s monarch. It is groundbreaking and should be welcomed – it aims to provide "legal protection for women and children from abuse in Saudi Arabia".
Saudis are being encouraged by the campaign to report cases of domestic abuse at locations around the kingdom including Madinah, Najran, Makkah and Riyadh. Saudi columnist Samar Fatany has said publicly that one in every six women is abused verbally, physically or emotionally every day, and 90% of the abusers are husbands or fathers.
According to Samira Al-Ghamdi, a Jeddah-based psychologist and founding member of the Society for Protecting the Family, the main problem lies in a social system that accepts the right of men to govern unconditionally.
The Arabic script at the bottom of the advert closely translates as "the tip of the iceberg". Seeing it could save lives.
guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media 2013
Alloka

Alloka (37)

Alloka
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10 lashes for driving a car? My God! This article claims that women in Saudi Arabia cannot drive a car, see advert and uncensored pages or any images in Internet without a man guardian's permission, vote or even work in underwear shops. Otherwise they can be punished by their husbands and fathers. We can only imagine how do they punish "their" women behind their closed doors. Men can abuse women in this country with impunity. What religion do they profess? Who do they pray to? This society is seriously ill.

nica2000

nica2000

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Very good, all is correct! :-)

(except for the situation described in the article, I have been there and unfortunately all is true.)

Alloka

Alloka (37)

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Thank you, Nica! All this discourage me from visiting this country...

Dennis Paulsen

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10 lashes for driving a car? My God! This article claims that women in Saudi Arabia cannot drive a car, see advert and uncensored pages or any images in Internet without a man guardian's permission, vote or even work in underwear shops. Otherwise they can be punished by their husbands and fathers. We can only imagine how do they punish "their" women behind their closed doors. Men can abuse women in this country with impunity. What religion do they profess? Who do they pray to? This society is seriously ill.

Good.

Or maybe you could say....

This article states that women in Saudi Arabia are not allowed to drive a car, or watch any advert or images on internet without a mail guardian`s permission. Neighter can they vote. They are also not allowed to work in any underwear shop. This is outrageous! I can only try to imagine what tipe of punishment these poor woman are subjected to behind closed doors. What kind of religion do these people profess? In my opinion, this is a seriously sick society.

Alloka

Alloka (37)

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Thank you Dennis! I like your version.))

Dennis Paulsen

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My pleasure. Keep up the good work.

jonmaz

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Hello Dennis.   Greetings from Melboune, Australia.   I enjoyed reading your alternative text.

 

I was interested in your use of the word "neither" ( let's ignore the typo!)

I am far from being a grammarian but it's employment just did not look correct to me.   After a little research, I am nearly certain that "nor" would have been better than "neither".   In support of my notion, you might be interested in something I have copied...

 

“Nor” doesn’t necessarily have to appear in a sentence with the word “neither.” “Nor” can start a sentence. For example, if you’ve just mentioned that you don’t usually wake up at 6 a.m. and you want to continue being negative, you can start another sentence with “nor”: “Nor do I like to wake up at 5 a.m.” Another option is to combine the two negative ideas into one sentence and then start the second part with “nor”: “I don’t usually wake up at 6 a.m., nor do I like to wake up at 5 a.m.” 

 

What do you think?    Best wishes.    John

Dennis Paulsen

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Hi John

Australia, what a surprise. Thank you for your comment. My home language is Afrikaans and I use Busuu to study both Deutsch and English. The corrections help me tremendously with my English. You are absolutely right, `nor' in that contex is a better word and I will remember that for future use. Thanks again for your good advice.

Regards

Dennis.

:))

Medweschonok

Medweschonok (47)

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In my opinion neither can they vote or they cannot vote either is grammatically correct.
For instance you may say they can neither vote nor are they allowed to drive a car.

Alloka

Alloka (37)

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Спасибо, Медвежонок!